Precision Nutrition and Wellness Initiative Leadership

Dr. Floyd "Ski" Chilton, PhD

520-621-5327

fchilton@email.arizona.edu

Professor, Department of Nutritional Sciences

Associate Director, The BIO5 Institute

Director, The Precision Wellness Initiative

RESEARCH & INTERESTS

Dr. Chilton is passionate about providing solutions to overcome physical and emotional suffering so that people can live better, more joyful lives. He is a successful innovator in a wide range of areas including an academic professor (with over 140 scientific publications), an entrepreneur (starting several companies and one non-profit organization), and an inventor (holding over 25 patents). Dr. Chilton is widely recognized in academia and industry for his work on nutrition in the context of variation in the human genome and has been a pioneer in the areas of personalized or precision nutrition and wellness. Dr. Chilton has over 30 years of continuous funding from the National Institutes of Health.

Specifically, Dr. Chilton’s work examines how genetic and epigenetic variations interact with human diets (especially the modern Western diet) to drive inflammation and inflammatory disorders (including cardiovascular disease and cancer), as well as psychiatric/developmental disorders (ADHD, autism spectrum disorder, and depression). These precision-, individualized- and population-based research approaches provide a wide range of opportunities to benefit humans that include: 1) providing a long-sought pathogenetic mechanism that underscores the different biologic behavior of inflammatory diseases in different racial/ethnic populations; 2) discovering new biomarkers of disease aggressiveness for early diagnostic and therapeutic intervention; 3) revealing new therapeutic strategies to affect disease aggressiveness using precision gene-based dietary, wellness and/or pharmacologic interventions; and 4) creating therapeutic foods and supplements that optimize immune system and brain development for different populations around the world. Dr. Chilton has won numerous awards for this work, including the Alumni Achievement Award at Western Carolina University, the Denham Harmon Outstanding Research Achievement Award from the American College for Advancement of Medicine and the 2016 Established Investigator Award at Wake Forest School of Medicine.

In addition to his research, Dr. Chilton has also had the opportunity to touch hundreds of thousands of lives as an author of five lay books focused on nutrition, diet, and physical and mental health. These books include Inflammation Nation (Simon and Schuster), Win the War Within (Rodale), The Gene Smart Diet (Rodale) and Made to Crave Action Plan(Zondervan). His most recent book, The Rewired Brain addresses the issue of the unconscious mind, its capacity to negatively impact our lives, and how thought patterns induce genetic (epigenetic) changes that alter brain circuitry. This gives humans the capacity to rewire and change their minds and thus their lives

Dr. Floyd "Ski" Chilton, PhD

Dr. Jennifer Barton, PhD

520-621-4116

barton@email.arizona.edu

Director, BIO5 Institute

Professor of Biomedical Engineering

Professor of Biosystems Engineering

Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Professor of Optical Sciences

RESEARCH & INTERESTS

Dr. Jennifer Barton, Ph.D. is known for her development of miniature endoscopes that combine two novel imaging techniques: optical coherence tomography and fluorescence spectroscopy. She also evaluates the suitability of these optical techniques for detecting early cancer development in patients and pre-clinical models. She is particularly interested in colon and ovarian cancer, and conducted the first pilot test of optical coherence tomography in women, seeking to determine if this technique could identify the early stages of cancerous development. Dr. Barton has also conducted significant research into laser-tissue interaction and dynamic optical properties of blood. This work laid the groundwork for a novel therapeutic laser to treat disorders of the skin’s blood vessels (port wine stains). She has published over 90 peer-reviewed journal papers in these and related research areas.Dr. Barton was inaugural Head of the Department of Biomedical Engineering and previously served as Assistant Director of BIO5. She currently holds the position of Associate Vice President for Research. She is a fellow of SPIE- the International Optics Society, and the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. Keywords: bioimaging, biomedical optics, biomedical engineering, bioengineering, cancer.

Dr. Jennifer Barton, PhD

Dr. Yves Lussier, MD

520-626-0245

yves@email.arizona.edu

Director, UAHS Center for Biomedical Informatics & Biostatistics

Associate Director, Informatics, UA BIO5 Institute

Associate Vice President / Chief Knowledge Officer, UA Health Sciences

Professor, Medicine - (Tenure Track)

Professor, Statistics-GIDP

RESEARCH & INTERESTS

Dr. Lussier has extensive experience in advising and leading computational oncology and informatics research and service groups. He established the first university-wide biomedical informatics core services at the University of Illinois at Chicago and at the University of Arizona. Dr. Lussier is currently the chair of the National Library of Medicine Extramural Grant Review (NIH BLIRC 2014) and is the co-founder of two international conferences in translational bioinformatics (the AMIA Summit on Translational Bioinformatics and The Translational Bioinformatics Conference). He has contributed and is servicing on about thirty board of directors, as well as scientific and editorial boards inclusive of pharmaceuticals, journals, information technology startups and large corporations. Dr. Lussier is currently the Associate Director of Cancer Informatics and Health Precision Medicine at the University of Arizona Cancer Center. Directing services in clinical research informatics (CRI) and translational bioinformatics (TBI), Dr. Lussier has previously conceived, directed, hired, and managed the first TBI and CRI service cores of three NIH-funded grants and their renewal: (i) The Institute for Translational Medicine of the University of Chicago (CTSA 5UL1RR024999, Informatics Core Director jointly with JS, 2006-11), (ii) Assoc. Director for the U of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center (5UL1RR024999; 2006-11), and (iii) the Director of the Informatics Core of the Northeast Biodefense Center at Columbia University (5U54AI057158, 2003-6). Dr. Lussier's translational bioinformatics expertise includes his research group which has produced over 145 scientific papers and he has presented at 14 conference keynote addresses.  He has mentored or co-mentored 22 PhD candidates and 21 post-doctoral fellows, of which five obtained K-awards and two are Directors for Biomedical Informatics Departments and/or Institutes in their respective institutions (Drs. Philip Payne at Ohio State University and Neil Sarkar at Brown University).

Dr. Yves Lussier, MD

Dr. Michael Hammer, PhD

520-621-9828

mfh@email.arizona.edu

    Associate Director, Omics, BIO5 Institute

    Director, Division of Technology and Innovation, Center for Applied Genetics and Genomic Medicine

    Research Scientist, Arizona Research Laboratories, Division of Biotechnology

    Research Scientist, Neurology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Anthropology, Steele Children's Research Center, and the UA Cancer Center

    RESEARCH & INTERESTS

    Dr. Michael Hammer is a Research Scientist in the Division of Biotechnology at the University of Arizona with appointments in the Department of Neurology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Bio5, the School of Anthropology, the University of Arizona Cancer Center, and the Steele Children's Research Center. Currently, Dr. Hammer is interested in the use of the latest DNA sequencing technology to infer the underlying genetic architecture of neurodevelopmental diseases. Since 1991 Dr. Hammer has directed of the University of Arizona Genetics Core (UAGC), a facility that provides training and molecular biology services to University and biotechnology communities at large. After receiving his Ph.D. in Genetics at the University of California at Berkeley in 1984, he performed post-doctoral research at Princeton and Harvard. Over the past two decades, Dr. Hammer has headed a productive research lab in human evolutionary genetics, resulting in over 100 published articles documenting the African origin of human diversity, interbreeding between modern humans and archaic forms of the genus Homo, and genome diversity in the great apes. His lab and the UAGC were early adopters of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and the application of whole-genome analysis in humans, and his lab has been a key player in the Gibbon and Baboon Genome Projects, as well as a consortium that has analyzed the genomes of over 100 Great Apes (GAPE Project). In the past 3 years, Dr. Hammer's research team has successfully employed NGS methods to identify molecular lesions causing neurodevelopmental disorders in undiagnosed children. This has led to the publication of articles identifying pathogenic variants associated with early-onset epileptic encephalopathies. His lab is also currently pursuing studies to identify modifier genes that alter the expression of major genes and how they contribute to phenotypic heterogeneity in Mendelian disorders.

    Dr. Michael Hammer, PhD

    Dr. Michael Worobey, PhD

    520-626-3456

    worobey@email.arizona.edu

    Associate Director, BIO5 Institute

    Associate Director, Microbiome

    Department Head, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

    Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

    RESEARCH & INTERESTS

    Dr. Michael Worobey, PhD, uses the genomes of viruses to trace the evolution of major communicable diseases, such as HIV/AIDS and influenza. He employs an evolutionary approach to understand the origins, emergence, and control of pathogens, in particular RNA viruses and retroviruses such as HIV and influenza virus. The research program integrates fieldwork, theory and methodology, molecular biology, and molecular evolutionary analysis of gene sequences in a phylogenetic framework. Current wet-lab projects in Dr. Worobey’s Biosafety Level 3 facility involve recovery of damaged and/or ancient DNA from a variety of sources including paraffin-embedded human tissue specimens, blood smears, and museum specimens. The two main efforts are: 1) reconstructing the emergence of HIV-1 group M in central Africa and North America using fossil HIV-1 sequences, and 2) investigating the evolution of AIDS-related viruses in wild-living African primates using non-invasively-collected samples.

    Dr. Michael Worobey, PhD